close
close

A man’s trip from Vancouver to Monaco for an F1 race takes a nasty turn: a lawsuit

Article content

Plans to travel to Monaco to watch the Formula One Grand Prix from a hotel room overlooking the race track have gone awry for a Vancouver traveler who has filed a lawsuit seeking more than $18,000 in additional hotel expenses from an online booking company and hotel chain.

James Mann is suing Fairmont Hotels and the online booking company after a hotel room at the Fairmont Monte Carlo that he purchased and paid three months in advance for a three-night stay in May 2022 via Trip.com was canceled two days before check-in – in, according to a notice of civil action in the Supreme Court of BC.

Article content

The lawsuit says Trip.com sent him an email informing him that his confirmed three-night room, for which he paid more than $8,000, was no longer available, and advised him to call them to rebook. .

Mann sent numerous emails insisting that Trip.com honor the reservation, and when they did not, on the day he was supposed to check in, he found what he said was “the last hotel room in Monte Carlo” available for the Grand Prix, paying approximately $26,700 — $18,500 more than the original reservation.

He also said he was frustrated that the “expected peaceful viewing of the race” did not occur because the expensive hotel room he could have booked at the other hotel did not have a view of the track, the lawsuit said.

Meanwhile, the Fairmont Hotel offered Mann a room on the day he wanted, but the rate was more than $20,500 a night, or a total of $61,700.

However, Trip.com said the maximum it would offer in compensation for this room would be $8,200 per night.

Mann said he sought compensation from Trip.com for “breach of contract” and the inconvenience caused by the cancellation, and was offered about $9,200 – about $1,100 more than he would have paid for the original reservation.

Article content

He rejected it, citing the inconvenience, discomfort and “torment” that the cancellation caused, as well as the “exorbitant amount” he had to spend to book a less fit-for-purpose room at a second hotel.

He is seeking $18,446.62 in special damages, representing the difference between the cost of the original reservation and the amount he paid at the second hotel, as well as general damages for the economic losses, pain, agony and suffering he suffered.

None of the allegations were proven in court.

Recommended by the editors


Bookmark our site and support our journalism: Don’t miss the news you need to know – add VancouverSun.com and TheProvince.com to your bookmarks and sign up for our newsletters here.

You can also support our journalism by becoming a digital subscriber: For just $14 a month you can get unlimited access to The Vancouver Sun, The Province, National Post and 13 other Canadian news sites. Support us by subscribing today: The Vancouver Sun | Province.

Share this article on your social network